Encouraging Shared Bike Usage In San Francisco
What We Did
User Research
Product Strategy
Product Design
What We Delivered
Hi-Fidelity Mockups
Clickable Prototype
Styleguide
How We Did It
Sketch
InVision
2 Week Sprint
Overview
The Business
At the start of 2018, the SFMTA issued the city’s first permit to operate a stationless bike share service. The permit was awarded to JUMP Bikes which has demonstrated a commitment to San Francisco’s priorities of providing a safe, equitable and accountable bike share system and is the only company to have fulfilled the requirements of the SFMTA’s stationless bike share permit application.


The Problem
The City of San Francisco is committed to growing the use of shared bicycles and does not want to dampen the spirit of JUMP Bike’s vision. Therefore, the two organizations want a better understanding of potential bicycle riders’ needs and desires for the dockless bike-share experience. How we might help encourage riders not only to participate but also to participateresponsibly.
Do our users
know about Jump
commute via bike
think biking is safe
know where to park
commute every day
know about Jump
?
User Research Summary
Objective
SFMTA has a diverse user base. We decided to categorize our users with behavioral and psychographic traits instead of traditional demographic data.
Constraints
The short time frame limited our ability to recruit for in-person interviews. Time constraints also limited the number of respondents to our survey.
Methods
We created an online survey to gather some quantitative insights and paired that with several in-person interviews for qualitative insights.
Survey Insights
90% of respondents listed casual riding as their primary use case for shared bikes. 
80% of respondents were aware of the Jump brand.
79% of respondents had a neutral or positive view of shared bike safety.
43% have not used a Shared Bike before.
Product Strategy Summary
Objective
There were many touchpoints we could impact and our main objective was to clearly define what and where we were designing.
Constraints
Our client was SFMTA, and while there may be improvements or concepts that affect the Jump/Uber app we focused on the SFMTA website.
Methods
We generated many ideas in our exploration and used a 2x2 matrix to prioritize. We also leveraged competitive analysis for insights.
Solution Definition
Feature Prioritization
Keeping our target user in mind, we created a feature prioritization matrix from the feature analysis of the bike competitors and the service design analysis of other cities. We considered the entire system as we created this chart: JUMP App, SFMTA website, and Uber App.

Competitive Analysis
We looked at features and patterns at two different levels. We compared maps and routes from shared bike apps like Jump, Lime, and Lyft. We also looked holistically at shared bike systems in cities like Montreal and New York City to see how we could make a larger impact.

Product Design Summary
Objective
Our primary goal was to encourage bike usage by providing a seamless and efficient routing option for consistent commuters.
Constraints
The design needed to work within the existing SFTMA website. Visually, we wanted to use and honor the recent brand redesign.
Methods
We used a mobile-first approach, this format also matched the primary device use case for our consistent commuters.
Color Usage Iterations
Trip Planner User Flow
Color
Brand
White
FFFFFF
Blue
‍0077BB
Grey
BFC5CC
Orange
F05C1F
Logo Usage
Mobile
Desktop
Typography
Title
Helvetica Neue
Bold - 36 pt

H1
Helvetica Neue
Medium - 24 pt

H2
Helvetica Neue
Regular - 21 pt

H3
Helvetica Neue
Regular - 18 pt

Body
Helvetica Neue
Light - 14 pt

Button
Helvetica Neue
Medium - 14 pt

Icons
Search
Arrow
Start
End
Parking
Alert

*Icons modified from IBM Icon Set
Project Reflection
Learnings
The biggest take away from this project was taking a service design perspective in defining the solution space. It was important to consider all the areas that we could design for and to evaluate how they would be impacted by our design decisions.
Next Steps
We had positive feedback on the usability of the prototype and our next design challenge would be taking this mobile design to desktop. Within the mobile version, we want to continue to refine and simplify the user flow and scrub through and refine the visual design.